Boston: the good, the bad and the ugly

If it wasn’t for the surveillance video that showed Usaama Rahim charging JTTF members, Imam Ibrahim Rahim’s  claim that his brother was shot in the back  would have probably set off a repeat of what was seen in Ferguson and Baltimore.

As the trial and sentencing of Boston Bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev fades from the headlines, the shooting of suspected terrorist Usaama Rahim by Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) members, brings the city of Boston and Islamic terrorism back into the spotlight. 

The old adage of “where there’s smoke there’s fire” seems to certainly apply with Islamic related terror activities and Boston.

The good . . .

The top brass overseeing the FBI/JTTF in Boston apparently learned a very expensive lesson in the wake of the 2013 Boston bombing.   Surveillance and collection activities in regards to suspected Islamic terrorists in the Boston area must be a priority.  It takes just one major terror incident to slip by to attract all the critics and have operations placed under a microscope for review.

In a report we made in 2013, reference was made to an article by Bill Gertz of the Washington Beacon where he wrote:

Critics said the FBI’s failure to properly investigate Tsarnaev was a repeat of the bureau’s lapse in missing advance signs of the Islamist radicalization of accused Fort Hood massacre shooter, Army Maj. Nidal Hasan.

Details about the shooting of Usaama Rahim and the Boston terror probe are still coming in, but it is obvious that the JTTF had obtained information about a potential threat  and was actively conducting surveillance of the subject.

The bad . . .

Some policy makers at the federal and local levels of government still want to embrace Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) progams such as the one promoted by the Muslim Public Affairs Council (MPAC) – Safe Spaces.    Such programs hamper proven counter-terror techniques, relying instead on Muslim community/mosque leaders to identify “misguided individuals” and contact the authorities when these leaders feel the threat warrants it.

The recent Boston incident provides an excellent example of why such CVE initiatives, like MPACs Safe Spaces, generally do not work:

  • Usaama Rahim’s brother, Imam Ibrahim Rahim, is a leading Islamic leader in Boston and claims he was not aware of his brother’s radicalization.  The Rahim family’s attorney told reporters that the family was completely unaware of any radicalization or ties to ISIS.
  • Imam Ibrahim Rahim claimed on twitter that his brother was shot three times in the back by authorities.  This has been shown to be a fabrication based on official reports and statements by community leaders that viewed surveillance footage of the incident.

boston-tweet-shotinback

  • Another Boston Islamic community leader,  Imam Abdullah Faaruuq was quoted in the Boston Herald saying:

If they thought he was a very dangerous person, they should have taken precautions in approaching him. I would. I wouldn’t approach a wild animal or anything I thought was dangerous without being fully prepared if I wanted to capture him and keep him alive. I don’t think they wanted to keep him alive.

As was shown with Boston Bombing case, Islamic community leaders are probably not the best source of to be relied on to identify radical elements and notify authorities.   If it wasn’t for the surveillance video that showed Usaama Rahim charging JTTF members, Imam Rahim’s claim that his brother was shot in the back would have probably set off a repeat of what was seen in Ferguson and Baltimore.

 The ugly . . .

As we have noted in the past, expect an apologist and misinformation campaign by Islamists that spins the shooting into a victim-hood portrayal of Muslims.   Since Usaama Rahim was black, race will be highlighted to gain sympathy from minority communities.

In short – the facts be damned.

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